picture for embarkEmbark is one word that carries a certain romantic appeal to it. We embark on adventures, we embark on love heists, we embark on journeys, we embark on explorations and voyages, we embark on scientific quests and the list goes on. Behind all these vistas is one common thread: the need to set out and explore what there is in this world. In fact, in a way, the purpose of mankind on this planet has been to embark on these quests since time immemorial, and the good and bad of all these quests is undertaken by our predecessors is before us: in the form of our present day world.

Pronunciation: em-bahrk

Meanings of Embark

1. To cause to board a vessel or aircraft.
2. To enlist (a person or persons) or invest (capital) in an enterprise.
3. To set out on a venture; commence.

Master’s Tip to Learn Embark

A couple of ways you can remember this word:

1. Etymology:
The word is derived from from Middle French, the French of 1400 to 1600, embarquer, from em-, “in, into” + barque, “small ship”. So basically when you embark on something, you LEAVE ON A SHIP TO YOUR DESTINATION.

2. Mnemonic :
A simple one, though we admit it is a little immature: when you EMBARK on a journey, your dog BARKS.

Sentence Examples for Embark:

1. The train stopped at the platform so that men could embark on their journeys.
2. Natalie embarked upon a new career and hope it brings her a lot of joy.
3. “Confidence is that feeling by which the mind embarks in great and honorable courses with a sure hope and trust in itself.” – Marcus Tullius Cicero (Ancient Roman Lawyer, Writer, Scholar, Orator and Statesman, 106 BC-43 BC)
4. “Life’s short span forbids our embarking on far-reaching hopes” – Horace (Ancient Roman Poet. 65 BC-8 BC)
5. “Whoever embarks with a woman embarks with a storm; but they are themselves the safety boats”