Origin of the word Neonate:

Neonate is a word that comes from the same Latin word root as Nascent, ‘nasc-,nat-’, meaning ‘born or birth’. Some words based on this root are:

Natal: Relating to or accompanying birth.
Prenatal: Occurring or existing before birth.
Nascent: Being born or beginning.

Another word that we use incessantly and is second nature to us comes from this source. The word is nature itself. Nature is a derivative from the Latin word natura, meaning “essential qualities or innate disposition”. This word is further a derivative of our root under study ‘nat-’. Originally, natura referred to the intrinsic characteristics of plants, animals, and other features of the world. These were the features one was born with or existed right at the start. Hence, the word nature comes with a reference to these qualities. In modern times, the word nature is a variety of ways. One of those uses refers to the natural characteristics of a person. The other refers to the characteristics of this world and the features of this world minus the human beings.

The dictionary definitions for NEONATE are as follows:
1. A newborn child, or one in its first 28 days. (noun)

Masters Tip to remember NEONATE:
The mental image of a new born baby should be enough to learn this word.
Or you can learn the word from this expression:
Neonate= Neo + Natal= New + Born=Newborn
This simple LHS=RHS style equation should do the job.

Usage Examples for NEONATE:
1.  Later, along with the distressed parents, I watched the neonate on the ventilator.
2. While the Jaipur Literary fair is still a neonate, it will be interesting to see how the literary circles of India are affected by this fair.

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